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Breast Cancer, Genitourinary Cancers, Ovarian Cancer CME ACCREDITED Watch Time: 90 mins

touchCONGRESS Antibody-drug conjugates for patients with solid tumours: Practical analysis of the latest data from ESMO 2020

Watch this two-part activity discussing the latest developments in antibody-drug conjugates for solid tumours. Filmed following presentations at ESMO 2020.

Part 1: Watch internationally renowned expert Mikel Ross review key data from the congress Watch Now
Part 2: Choose from leading experts who discuss what the latest data mean for global and regional practice Select An Interview

  • Part 1: Data Review
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Introduction
Watch Time: 00:00
Antibody-drug conjugates in breast, cervical and ovarian cancer
Watch Time: 04:09
Antibody-drug conjugates in genitourinary and other solid tumours
Watch Time: 16:29
Adverse event management for antibody-drug conjugates
Watch Time: 24:11
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Overview

Watch Mikel Ross reviewing the latest data from ESMO 2020 for antibody-drug conjugates in a range of solid tumours, and consider:

  • Which antibody-drug conjugates are being investigated in solid tumours?
  • How do antibody-drug conjugates improve outcomes for patients with solid tumours?
  • How can we predict and manage adverse events with antibody-drug conjugates?
About Mikel Ross

Mikel Ross is a Board-Certified Nurse Practitioner on the Breast Medicine Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), New York, NY, USA. In this role, he collaborates with an interdisciplinary team delivering medical oncology support to breast cancer patients across the continuum of care. In addition to patient care, he collaborates on many initiatives including oral oncolytic adherence, proactive management of symptomatic patients and most notably as the lead clinician for the MSKCC’s scalp cooling program to limit chemotherapy induced alopecia. His publications reflect this work with authorships on the topics of scalp cooling, oral medication adherence and proactive management of patient symptoms in oncology practice. read more

Mikel’s background is varied both in education and employment. He earned a BA in Political Science and a BS in Business Administration as a Pershing Scholar from Truman State University, Kirksville, MO, USA (1986). He then obtained an MA in International Relations as a Rotary Scholar from the University of Kent, Canterbury, UK (1990). His nursing education includes a BSN from St Louis University, St Louis, MO, USA (1996) and most recently an MSN from Hunter College, New York, NY, USA (2018). He has worked in both industry and clinical practice for multiple organizations including Boeing, Washington University in St Louis, Bristol-Myers Squibb, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey and now Memorial Sloan Kettering.

Mikel Ross discloses: Personal fees from: OncLive

  • Part 2: Expert Interviews
Mikel Ross
Watch Time: 11:28
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA

Mikel Ross discusses data describing antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) from the ESMO Virtual Congress 2020 and how they might affect the management of patients with solid tumours.

 
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Interview Questions

In this interview, Mikel Ross answers the following questions:

  • There are several different ADCs already available or in development – in which tumour types do you think ADCs have the most to offer?
  • Do you think ADCs are likely to be tested in earlier lines of treatment in the future?
  • Which adverse events are the most troublesome for patients receiving ADCs, and how much does the risk of interstitial lung disease affect patient selection for ADC therapy?
  • How do you counsel patients receiving ADCs with regards to AEs, and which supportive therapies do you recommend?
  • What did you consider to be the most potentially practice-altering data describing ADCs presented at ESMO this year?
  • Given the number of trials in progress involving ADCs, which studies would you be especially interested in seeing results from over the next 12 months?
About Mikel Ross

Mikel Ross is a Board-Certified Nurse Practitioner on the Breast Medicine Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), New York, NY, USA. In this role, he collaborates with an interdisciplinary team delivering medical oncology support to breast cancer patients across the continuum of care. In addition to patient care, he collaborates on many initiatives including oral oncolytic adherence, proactive management of symptomatic patients and most notably as the lead clinician for the MSKCC’s scalp cooling program to limit chemotherapy induced alopecia. His publications reflect this work with authorships on the topics of scalp cooling, oral medication adherence and proactive management of patient symptoms in oncology practice. read more

Mikel’s background is varied both in education and employment. He earned a BA in Political Science and a BS in Business Administration as a Pershing Scholar from Truman State University, Kirksville, MO, USA (1986). He then obtained an MA in International Relations as a Rotary Scholar from the University of Kent, Canterbury, UK (1990). His nursing education includes a BSN from St Louis University, St Louis, MO, USA (1996) and most recently an MSN from Hunter College, New York, NY, USA (2018). He has worked in both industry and clinical practice for multiple organizations including Boeing, Washington University in St Louis, Bristol-Myers Squibb, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey and now Memorial Sloan Kettering.

Mikel Ross discloses: Personal fees from OncLive.

Lena Sharp
Watch Time: 05:03
Regional Cancer Centre, Stockholm-Gotland, Sweden

Lena Sharp discusses data describing antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) from the ESMO Virtual Congress 2020 and how they might affect the management of patients with solid tumours.

 
 
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Interview Questions

In this interview, Lena Sharp answers the following questions:

  • There are several different ADCs already available or in development – in which tumour types do you think ADCs have the most to offer?
  • Do you think ADCs are likely to be tested in earlier lines of treatment in the future?
  • Which adverse events are the most troublesome for patients receiving ADCs, and how much does the risk of interstitial lung disease affect patient selection for ADC therapy?
  • How do you counsel patients receiving ADCs with regards to AEs, and which supportive therapies do you recommend?
  • What did you consider to be the most potentially practice-altering data describing ADCs presented at ESMO this year?
  • Given the number of trials in progress involving ADCs, which studies would you be especially interested in seeing results from over the next 12 months?
About Lena Sharp

Lena Sharp, RN, PhD, is a past president of the European Oncology Nursing Society. She is currently the Head of Department at the Regional Cancer Centre, Stockholm-Gotland, Sweden. Lena has been a cancer nurse since 1985. She has long experience in clinical cancer nursing, leadership, teaching and research. read more

Prior to taking up her post at the Regional Cancer Centre, Stockholm-Gotland, Lena Sharp was the chief nursing officer and patient safety coordinator in the Department of Oncology at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm. Her main areas of focus in cancer nursing research are patient safety, communication, leadership, inequalities and cancer care organization.

Lena Sharp has no financial interests/relationships or affiliations in relation to this activity.

Andreas Charalambous
Watch Time: 15:37
Cyprus University of Technology, Limassol, Cyprus

Andreas Charalambous discusses data for antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) from the ESMO Virtual Congress 2020 and how they might affect the management of patients with solid tumours.

 
 
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Interview Questions

In this interview, Andreas Charalambous answers the following questions:

  • There are several different ADCs already available or in development – in which tumour types do you think ADCs have the most to offer?
  • Do you think ADCs are likely to be tested in earlier lines of treatment in the future?
  • Which adverse events are the most troublesome for patients receiving ADCs, and how much does the risk of interstitial lung disease affect patient selection for ADC therapy?
  • How do you counsel patients receiving ADCs with regards to AEs, and which supportive therapies do you recommend?
  • What did you consider to be the most potentially practice-altering data describing ADCs presented at ESMO this year?
  • Given the number of trials in progress involving ADCs, which studies would you be especially interested in seeing results from over the next 12 months?
About Andreas Charalambous

Andreas Charalambous is an Associate Professor of Oncology and Palliative Care at Cyprus University of Technology, Limassol, Cyprus, and Adjunct Professor at University of Turku, Finland. He is the founder and past resident of the Cyprus Oncology Nursing Society and current president of the European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS). He is involved in national and international research programmes (HORIZON2020, ERASMUS+, COST) in various fields of cancer care. He has published over 100 national and international publications in esteemed journals in the fields of cancer care, symptom management, informal caregivers, quality care and supportive care. read more

Andreas started his nursing career in 1995. He obtained his BSc in Nursing Science in 1999 from the University of Northumbria, Newcastle, UK, and his MSc in Nursing Science and PhD in Oncology Nursing, both from Middlesex University, London, UK in 2002 and 2008, respectively. With a clinical background in cancer care and more specifically in oncology, he has worked clinically and academically in Cyprus and the UK He has a long and proven track record in academia since 2004.

Andreas Charalambous has no financial interests/relationships or affiliations in relation to this activity.

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Overview & Learning Objectives
Overview

In this activity, Mikel Ross reviews the latest data from ESMO 2020 for antibody-drug conjugates in a range of solid tumours, and offers practical guidance for adverse event management. This activity has been jointly provided by USF Health and touchIME.

Target audience

This activity is intended for specialist oncology nurses and nurses treating patients with cancer based in the EU, USA and the rest of the world. read more

Disclosures

USF Health adheres to ACCME, ANCC, and ACPE Standards regarding commercial support of continuing medical education. It is the policy of USF Health that the faculty and planning committee disclose real or apparent conflicts of interest relating to the topics of this educational activity, that relevant conflict(s) of interest are resolved and also that faculty will disclose any unlabeled/unapproved use of drug(s) or device(s) during their presentation.

Faculty

Mikel Ross discloses: Personal fees from OncLive.

Lena Sharp has no financial interests/relationships or affiliations in relation to this activity.

Andreas Charalambous has no financial interests/relationships or affiliations in relation to this activity.

Content Reviewer

Melanie Fyfe, MSN, APRN, AGCNS-BC, BMTCN, has no financial interests/relationships or affiliations in relation to this activity.

Touch Medical Director

Alison Scott, PhD, has no financial interests/relationships or affiliations in relation to this activity.

USF Health Office of Continuing Professional Development and touchIME staff have no financial interests/relationships or affiliations in relation to this activity.

Requirements for Successful Completion

A maximum of 0.75 contact hours may be earned by learners who successfully complete this continuing nursing education activity.

In order to receive credit for this activity, participants must review and complete the post-test and evaluation form to obtain CE credit.

If you have questions regarding credit please contact [email protected]

Accreditations

ANCC

USF Health is accredited as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

A maximum of 0.75 contact hours may be earned by learners who successfully complete this continuing nursing education activity.

ILNA

The program content has been reviewed by the Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation (ONCC) and is acceptable for recertification points.

Disclaimer: ONCC review is only for designating content to be used for ILNA points and is not for NCPD accreditation. NCPD programs must be formally approved for contact hours by an acceptable accreditator/approver of nursing NCPD to be used for recertification by ONCC. If the NCPD provider fails to obtain formal approval to award contact hours by an acceptable accrediting/approval body, no information related to ONCC recertification or ILNA categories may be used in relation to the program.

Date of original release: 12 October 2020. Date credits expire: 12 October 2021.

Learning Objectives

After watching this activity, participants will be better able to:

  • Recognize the antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) that are available for the treatment of solid tumours
  • Summarize how emerging and evolving ADCs may improve outcomes for patients with solid tumours
  • Discuss practical strategies for the management of adverse events associated with approved ADCs for solid tumours

This content is intended for healthcare professionals only. Please confirm that you are a healthcare professional.

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Question 1/5
Which of the following is a mechanism of action for an available antibody-drug conjugate?
Correct

Microtubule assembly disruption is the mechanism of action of ADCs with cytotoxic payloads consisting of MMAE,1,2 DM4,3 DM14 and MMAF.5,6 PARP inhibition, tyrosine kinase inhibition and immune responses are not mechanisms of action in current ADCs.

ADC, antibody-drug conjugate; DM1, mertansine/emtansine; DM4, ravtansine/soravtansine; MMAE, monomethyl auristatin E; MMAF, monomethyl auristatin F; PARP, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

References

  1. O’Donnell P, et al. Ann Oncol. 2020;31:S579–80 (746P).
  2. Coleman RL, et al. Ann Oncol. 2020;31:S1162–3 (LBA32).
  3. O’Malley DM, et al. Ann Oncol. 2020;31:S626–7 (833P).
  4. Martinez-Garcia J, et al. Ann Oncol. 2020;31:S358 (291P).
  5. Hamilton E, et al. Ann Oncol. 2020;31:S627–8 (836P).
  6. National Cancer Institute Drug Dictionary. XMT-1536. Available at: www.cancer.gov/publications/dictionaries/cancer-drug/def/792493 (accessed September 2020).
Question 2/5
Your patient with ovarian cancer experienced disease progression on a chemotherapy and has been prescribed an antibody-drug conjugate with a similar mechanism of action. How do you explain the rationale?
Correct

Antibody-drug conjugates enable specific targeting of cytotoxic agents,1 so the effective dose of a cytotoxic agent can be increased to overcome tumour insensitivity, while maintaining an acceptable toxicity profile.

Reference

  1. Manzano A, Ocaña A. Cancers (Basel). 2020;12:2223.
Question 3/5
Which part of an antibody-drug conjugate is most responsible for its toxicity profile?
Correct

Adverse events with antibody-drug conjugates are related to the toxicity profile of the cytotoxic payload.1

Reference

  1. Manzano A, Ocaña A. Cancers (Basel). 2020;12:2223.
Question 4/5
Based on data presented at the ESMO Virtual Congress 2020, which of the following adverse events is more likely to occur in patients receiving microtubule-disrupting antibody-drug conjugates than those receiving antibody-drug conjugates that inhibit topoisomerase?
Correct

In data presented at the ESMO Virtual Congress 2020, peripheral neuropathy (any grade) was reported for up to 50% of patients receiving microtubule-disrupting antibody-drug conjugates,1,2 and was not a feature of adverse events with antibody-drug conjugates that inhibit topoisomerase.3,4

References

  1. O’Donnell P, et al. Ann Oncol. 2020;31:S579–80 (746P).
  2. Coleman RL, et al. Ann Oncol. 2020;31:S1162–3 (LBA32).
  3. Bardia A, et al. Ann Oncol. 2020;31:S1149–50 (LBA17).
  4. Loriot Y, et al. Ann Oncol. 2020;31:S1156 (LBA24).
Question 5/5
Your patient is receiving trastuzumab deruxtecan and experiences grade 3 interstitial lung disease. How do you manage your patient?
Correct

For grade 3 interstitial lung disease, the patient should be admitted to hospital and the ADC withdrawn alongside other measures, beginning with high-dose IV steroids.1

ADC, antibody-drug conjugate; ILD, interstitial lung disease; IV, intravenous.

Reference

  1. Powell CA, et al. Ann Oncol. 2020;31:S357–8 (289P).
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